History, Humanism, and other Shit.

2 notes

SPOILERS?
Just saw Argo. Let’s talk Argo.
Let’s review what the all powerful Wikipedia can tell us about the events talked about in this film, otherwise known as The Canadian Caper (this is going to be important.) Link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_caper
Basic summary: 1979, a huge amount of protesters in Iran swarm a US embassy, a small group of Americans escaped becoming part of the Iran Hostage Crisis. Some of these people were captured, but the others tried to make their way to the British Embassy, as they were told to do. They were blocked from continuing by more protesters. The Americans then spent a couple nights hopping from house to house until they were taken in by  a Canadian immigration officer and the Canadian ambassador Taylor. The ambassador then initiated the operation that is the focus of the film, calling the Canadian sec. of state and the Canadian PM, who all decided to take the Americans out by creating fake Canadian identities for them. The CIA was contacted to help, creating fake visas to Iran. 
The CIA then contacted Mendez (main character of the film)  to help set up the cover. Materials needed were sent via the Canadian government, who worked closely with the CIA on this operation. Mendez helped the Americans get out via plane.
—————
This is a bit different then what occurs in the film. The CIA seems to cook up the entire plan on their own. The Canadians don’t really seem to do anything other than the initial hiding of Americans, and.. well, the Americans pretend to be Canadians, so I guess our northern friends graciously contributed their identity. W/o background knowledge on the original event, one could be forgiven for wondering why Americans were so pleased with Canada by the end of the film.
The film also states that the Americans were turned away from the British embassy, as well as the embassy of New Zealand, when in fact the original plan was to go to the British embassy. 
PLEASE CORRECT ME IF I AM WRONG, as I just read up on the events, but effectively Argo cuts out most contributions from other countries in this event to make America the Big Damn Hero. (Carter himself said “90% of the contributions to the ideas and the consummation of the plan was Canadian. And the movie gives almost full credit to the American CIA. And with that exception, the movie is very good. But Ben Affleck’s character in the film was… only in Tehran a day and a half. And the main hero, in my opinion, was Ken Taylor, who was the Canadian ambassador who orchestrated the entire process.”)
Not that it’s a bad film - it’s a pretty excellent film. This knowledge does change the connotations in one of the final scenes, though:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MTjJTsrglDA
Paraphrased:
"Did you see what the Canadians did? Why can’t we do something like that?"…"Argofuckyourself!"
Yes. How silly - this woman actually believes the Canadians could pull something like this off!

SPOILERS?

Just saw Argo. Let’s talk Argo.

Let’s review what the all powerful Wikipedia can tell us about the events talked about in this film, otherwise known as The Canadian Caper (this is going to be important.) Link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_caper

Basic summary: 1979, a huge amount of protesters in Iran swarm a US embassy, a small group of Americans escaped becoming part of the Iran Hostage Crisis. Some of these people were captured, but the others tried to make their way to the British Embassy, as they were told to do. They were blocked from continuing by more protesters. The Americans then spent a couple nights hopping from house to house until they were taken in by  a Canadian immigration officer and the Canadian ambassador Taylor. The ambassador then initiated the operation that is the focus of the film, calling the Canadian sec. of state and the Canadian PM, who all decided to take the Americans out by creating fake Canadian identities for them. The CIA was contacted to help, creating fake visas to Iran. 

The CIA then contacted Mendez (main character of the film)  to help set up the cover. Materials needed were sent via the Canadian government, who worked closely with the CIA on this operation. Mendez helped the Americans get out via plane.

—————

This is a bit different then what occurs in the film. The CIA seems to cook up the entire plan on their own. The Canadians don’t really seem to do anything other than the initial hiding of Americans, and.. well, the Americans pretend to be Canadians, so I guess our northern friends graciously contributed their identity. W/o background knowledge on the original event, one could be forgiven for wondering why Americans were so pleased with Canada by the end of the film.

The film also states that the Americans were turned away from the British embassy, as well as the embassy of New Zealand, when in fact the original plan was to go to the British embassy

PLEASE CORRECT ME IF I AM WRONG, as I just read up on the events, but effectively Argo cuts out most contributions from other countries in this event to make America the Big Damn Hero. (Carter himself said “90% of the contributions to the ideas and the consummation of the plan was Canadian. And the movie gives almost full credit to the American CIA. And with that exception, the movie is very good. But Ben Affleck’s character in the film was… only in Tehran a day and a half. And the main hero, in my opinion, was Ken Taylor, who was the Canadian ambassador who orchestrated the entire process.”)

Not that it’s a bad film - it’s a pretty excellent film. This knowledge does change the connotations in one of the final scenes, though:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MTjJTsrglDA

Paraphrased:

"Did you see what the Canadians did? Why can’t we do something like that?"…"Argofuckyourself!"

Yes. How silly - this woman actually believes the Canadians could pull something like this off!

Filed under Argo The Canadian Caper Iran Hostage Crisis Iran America US USA Canada Iranian Canadian American Canadian History CIA American History US history History Iranian History Film Historical drama America centrism Fuck the world of not america we did everything good in history

3 notes

LOOK WHAT I JUST GOT FOR ONLY $19.95
OH HOW I’VE WAITED

BOOK YOU ARE SO GOOD
I’VE WAITED SO LONG FOR YOU


(also i promise ill start updating more often i had work to do :( sorrys )

(also also my phone tried to face detect the guy beneath the wrench so that’s fun)

LOOK WHAT I JUST GOT FOR ONLY $19.95

OH HOW I’VE WAITED

BOOK YOU ARE SO GOOD

I’VE WAITED SO LONG FOR YOU

(also i promise ill start updating more often i had work to do :( sorrys )

(also also my phone tried to face detect the guy beneath the wrench so that’s fun)

Filed under Book Books History German History Nazi Germany Nazi Nazism Nazi Party NSDAP The Wages of Destruction Adam Tooze Tooze Economics Economy Economise WWII Hitler Adolf Hitler Nationalism National so good

4 notes

Nazi rally at Madison Square Garden, NYC, 1938

Members of the German American Bund march in New York, 30 October 1939. 

(Members of the German American Bund march in New York, 30 October 1939)

As the second World War escalated, not everyone in America was against the Nazi government in Germany. In 1933, Deputy Führer Rudolf Hess gave a German immigrant the duty of starting an American counterpart to the Nazi party. This organization was first called Friends of New Germany, which became the German American Bund three years later (the name change was intended to counter claims that the organization was not patriotic - a view that I doubt was altered, since, you know, Nazis).

They never exceeded 10,000 members, but participated in all sorts of Nazi-ish activities, such as infiltrating German American communities and trying to force newspapers to print articles supporting the Third Reich. The newsreel linked above shows one of the largest events pulled off by the German American Bund - their then-leader, Frtiz Kuhn, addressing 20,000 New Yorkers, criticizing the Roosevelt administration and their “Jew Deal”. Get it? Racists are so clever. /s

By the way, Kuhn was later found to have embezzled $14,000 from his organization. 

Filed under History American German America USA United States US United States of America German American Nazi Nazism Nazis NSDAP German American Bund Third Reich Hitler Roosevelt FDR New Deal 1930's New York Newsreel News also haven't posted in a while whoops college ill get back on that pinky promise

3 notes

People complain about how loud the government bangs the drums of war these days, but it was a whole different story back under Wilson’s administration. 
America was strongly isolationist during the years building up to WWI - Wilson actually won his second term partially by running on the slogan, “He Kept Us Out of War” - so once the administration decided to enter the conflict, they realized the nation needed major convincing. To help, the Wilson administration introduced the Four Minute Men.
The organization was pretty simple - respected members of communities across America volunteered to serve the Committee on Public Information. The Committee would then give them general topics and talking points, and these men would go to their various communities and give speeches around four minutes long, to inform and shift American public opinion on the war. 
A bit more direct than sending an administration worker to a news agency for interview, I think. 

People complain about how loud the government bangs the drums of war these days, but it was a whole different story back under Wilson’s administration. 

America was strongly isolationist during the years building up to WWI - Wilson actually won his second term partially by running on the slogan, “He Kept Us Out of War” - so once the administration decided to enter the conflict, they realized the nation needed major convincing. To help, the Wilson administration introduced the Four Minute Men.

The organization was pretty simple - respected members of communities across America volunteered to serve the Committee on Public Information. The Committee would then give them general topics and talking points, and these men would go to their various communities and give speeches around four minutes long, to inform and shift American public opinion on the war. 

A bit more direct than sending an administration worker to a news agency for interview, I think. 

Filed under History American History US USA America Four Minute Men War War History Propaganda Public Opinion News Media World War One World War 1 World War I WW1 WWI World War Wilson Woodrow Wilson President President Wilson

10 notes

Suffragist protester in Washington D.C., 1918. Her banner addresses President “Kaiser” Wilson - a president who lamented the lack of democracy in Germany, but presided over a nation which blocked half its citizens from voting.

Crazy court case story time! So, the 19th amendment to the Constitution was upheld in the SCOTUS trial Leser v. Garnett. Oscar Leser was suing to stop some women from registering to vote; in his opinion, the 19th amendment was not constitutional. The crux of his argument was that Maryland had not voted to ratify the amendment, so its actions “destroyed state autonomy”, and in addition, multiple states that had voted to ratify it did not have women’s suffrage on a state level.
So, basically, his argument was “Well, state law is more important!”, which didn’t really work out for him. 

Suffragist protester in Washington D.C., 1918. Her banner addresses President “Kaiser” Wilson - a president who lamented the lack of democracy in Germany, but presided over a nation which blocked half its citizens from voting.

Crazy court case story time! So, the 19th amendment to the Constitution was upheld in the SCOTUS trial Leser v. Garnett. Oscar Leser was suing to stop some women from registering to vote; in his opinion, the 19th amendment was not constitutional. The crux of his argument was that Maryland had not voted to ratify the amendment, so its actions “destroyed state autonomy”, and in addition, multiple states that had voted to ratify it did not have women’s suffrage on a state level.

So, basically, his argument was “Well, state law is more important!”, which didn’t really work out for him. 

Filed under History US history American history Feminism First wave feminism suffragists voting rights SCOTUS Supreme Court Court Cases Law World War 1

5 notes

Goebbels (center) visits the Degenerate Art Exhibition, Feburary 27, 1938.

Adolf Hitler (center left) and Adolf Ziegler (center right) visit the same, in 1937.

The Nazis found the sort of modern and abstract art that erupted into prominence in the Weimar period as degenerate. Like pretty much everything they didn’t like, they portrayed it as a sign of a society dying under the influence of sick and dangerous elements. In 1937, they created an exhibit titled "Entartete Kunst", or "Degenerate Art", which showcased confiscated subjects. They were hung haphazardly, with slogans insulting them scrawled on the walls, in a building chosen specifically for its dim and narrow layout. Some had the price museums had paid to obtain them before confiscation listed - with many of these being from the Weimar period, and not corrected for inflation differences, the prices seemed unfathomably high.

 

At the same time,  a “Great German Art” exhibition was held to show “pure” works of art. The two events were meant to contrast the clean Nazi-approved styles with the “degenerate art”.

 

The “Degenerate Art” exhibition was attended by twice as many viewers. 

Filed under History German History Nazism Nazis Nazi Nazi Germany Hitler Goebbels Art Modernism Dada Art History WW2

2 notes

Leaders of the March on Washington for Job and Freedom meet with JFK to discuss goals of the civil rights movement, on this date in 1963. Kennedy at the time felt the march would boost the chances of the Civil Rights Act passing - the bill passed on the second of July the next year.

Leaders of the March on Washington for Job and Freedom meet with JFK to discuss goals of the civil rights movement, on this date in 1963. Kennedy at the time felt the march would boost the chances of the Civil Rights Act passing - the bill passed on the second of July the next year.

Filed under History America American American History USA United States United States of America US Kennedy President Presidents US Presidents JFK MLK Martin Luther King Martin Luther King Jr Civil Rights Civil Rights Movement March on Washington Jobs Freedom